The result is this garbage

1: The website obesity crisis

A typically great talk by Maciej, who appears on this site more than most:

Let me start by saying that beautiful websites come in all sizes and page weights. I love big websites packed with images. I love high-resolution video. I love sprawling Javascript experiments or well-designed web apps.

This talk isn’t about any of those. It’s about mostly-text sites that, for unfathomable reasons, are growing bigger with every passing year.

While I’ll be using examples to keep the talk from getting too abstract, I’m not here to shame anyone, except some companies (Medium) that should know better and are intentionally breaking the web.

2: What’s a species, anyways?

The search for the red wolf’s origins have led scientists to a new theory about how evolution actually works.

3: All I want for Christmas is MIDI

i put “All I Want for Christmas is You” through a MIDI converter, and then back through an mp3 converter

the result is this garbage

4: The Music Word Processor: Who we are

In short: rather than music criticism, The Music Word Processor is music criticism criticism. This blog is a space to explore questions like: what is the state of music writing in the 21st century? Is the corporatization of music writing inevitable? What are the kinds of narratives constructed by music writers and publications?

5: Make Believe Mailer Vol. 6: ナイス ニューズレター! 力限りない

From a newsletter by Patrick St. Michel about supposedly “Japanese” artists on the web:

At some point in 2015, these badly photoshopped, boring homages to the first generation of vaporwave — which had been released unobtrusively through Mediafire for the most part — outnumbered releases from real Japanese artists. For a while, I just stopped using Bandcamp as a place to explore new Japanese music, because everything tagged “Japan” seemed like a lie. it was annoying, but not as annoying as toggling over to the “best-selling” section and seeing the exact same thing. And all of the albums seemed to come primarily from one place.

6: The science myths that will not die

Some dangerous myths get plenty of air time: vaccines cause autism, HIV doesn’t cause AIDS. But many others swirl about, too, harming people, sucking up money, muddying the scientific enterprise — or simply getting on scientists’ nerves. Here, Nature looks at the origins and repercussions of five myths that refuse to die.

7: What I’m currently reading

But, yeah, we might be living in a hologram

Wormhole entanglement and the firewall paradox

Amid some very recent “We’re definitely living in a hologram!!” ‘science’ reporting, I was reminded of this slightly less clickbaity, longer read about the implications of newly-discovered connections between two previously disparate theories about the universe. But, yeah, we might be living in a hologram.

Spoken

A curated email digest of ‘the best in story-driven podcasts’. Pair with Nick Quah’s Hot Pod, a Tinyletter about podcasts and podcasting.

Curious rituals (pdf)

This is marvellous:

The output of a research project conducted at Art Center College of Design (Pasadena, CA) in July-August 2012, the work presented here focuses on the body language of digital technologies used in everyday life: gestures, postures and rituals that appeared with the use of computers, cell phones, sensors or game controllers.

The backwards brain bicycle

Via Kottke, who wrote:

Do you think you could ride a bicycle that steers backwards… aka it turns left when you turn right and vice versa? It sounds easy but years of normal bike riding experience makes it almost impossible. Destin Sandlin of Smarter Everyday taught himself how to ride the backwards-steering bike; it took months. Then he tried riding a normal bicycle again…

Watching his brain click back and forth was pretty amazing.

Read an excerpt from the 33 1/3 book on Super Mario Bros. music

Why does Kondo take the most pride in his earliest hits? Because it was in these early pieces that he first understood how he was different from those who came before him. More than just a handful of catchy tunes, Super Mario Bros. is the cradle of Kondo’s lifelong contribution to video-game music. So it is only natural that he should cherish it as he does.

‘They,’ the singular pronoun, gets popular

Will the pronoun solve an old language problem?

Some neat apps/utilities/things

  • yozlet/randomrandom: See something interesting when you open a new empty browser tab.
  • StretchLink: Mac app that sits in the background, expanding shortened links and removing tracking code.
  • Syndicate: A Safari extension to quickly grab an RSS feed from the site you’re on.
  • Loading: See which Mac apps are using your network.
  • Spotmote: Control Spotify on your Mac with your iOS device.

I’m off to have a conversation with myself along these lines:

Recent Links: September 2013

Some recent links from my Pinboard:

  • The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Volume I. The full text from Richard Feynman’s lectures, originally given to Caltech students in the 1960s.
  • What did the Nazis know about the Manhattan Project? Operation Epsilon was a Second World War programme where ten German scientists were detained at a house near Cambridge and spied on to see if they revealed anything about the Nazi programme to create atomic weapons. This article looks at the time where they were told that the US had dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima.
  • SubToMe. A service and bookmarklet for subscribing to feeds in a variety of feedreaders. (I’m using Feedbin these days and I love it.)
  • Status Update. Heiko Julien’s Facebook statuses.
  • Clean Links. An iOS app for taking a shortened URL or one with tracking code and returning something a little nicer.
  • Remove to improve. Make your charts better by simplifying them. An animated guide.