Why is New Zealand sparing crayfish but torturing rabbits?

Nikki Mandow:

Lobsters have a total of 100,000 neurons. In the overall scheme of things, this isn’t many. It’s less than half those of an ant and a tenth of those of a cockroach.

By contrast, a rabbit has nearly 500 million neurons. (Humans, in case you are interested, have around 86 billion.)

So it seems inconsistent at the very least that it is illegal in New Zealand to cause a couple of minutes of bubbling suffering to an animal with almost no feeling, on the basis that they nevertheless do have a functioning nervous system. Yet it is fine to cause up to four days of suffering to an animal with a sophisticated nervous system.

This seems an appropriate place to drop in a link to DFW’s Consider the Lobster (pdf).

 

You’ll come across an unnerving reality

1: New Zealand announces 40 potential new flag designs

New Zealanders are to get a chance to vote on a new flag for their country, which could replace its existing graphic featuring the Union Jack.

2: Attack on the pentagon results in discovery of new mathematical tile | Science | The Guardian

Joy as mathematicians discover a new type of pentagon that can cover the plane leaving no gaps and with no overlaps. It becomes only the 15th type of pentagon known that can do this, and the first discovered in 30 years.

3: Love boat rejects: Unforgettable photos of people on cruise ships in the 1990s

Love Boat Rejects is a collection of pictures taken by Ian Hughes and his fellow photographers onboard American, Norwegian and Italian cruise ships throughout the 1990s.

4: Tech’s enduring great-man myth

The idea that particular individuals drive history has long been discredited. Yet it persists in the tech industry, obscuring some of the fundamental factors in innovation.

5: Guy walks into a bar

So a guy walks into a bar one day and he can’t believe his eyes. There, in the corner, there’s this one-foot-tall man, in a little tuxedo, playing a tiny grand piano.

So the guy asks the bartender, “Where’d he come from?”

And the bartender’s, like, “There’s a genie in the men’s room who grants wishes.”

Make sure you read the rest. It doesn’t proceed as you’d expect.

6: The music web is now so closed, you can’t share your favorite song

First, This Is My Jam announced they’re closing the service. (Note how classily they’re doing this: the site will go read-only with a permanent archive and API, all the data is being open sourced, users can export their data and/or opt-out it being archived.)

In the link above, Peter Kirn bemoans the devolution of our web-based music services:

Call it a jam session that has completely fallen apart.

Having Web services go dark is certainly not news in this day and age. We’ve come to expect that Internet services won’t be there forever. (Google Reader, anyone?)

But if you pull apart some of the backstory behind the end of a service called “This Is My Jam,” you’ll come across an unnerving reality of the way music on the Web is evolving (or devolving).

See also Rev Dan Catt’s post on how he’s manually archiving anything that isn’t persistent, like Spotify playlists.