A limit to human longevity

Brian Resnick reports for The Verge on how the average human lifespan is increasing, but the maximum remains constant:

The researchers analyzed the Human Mortality Database, which contains hundreds of years of population and mortality data for 38 countries.

They saw that while the percentage of people living to 70 has risen greatly since the 1900s (due to increased survival in childhood and better health care), the same cannot be said of people living past 100.

There are some gains in longevity after age 100, but they are much more modest. And the gains drop to near zero approaching 110.

By the time we reach later life our DNA has accumulated damage and our organs stop working. More of us are reaching later life, but there’s an apparent ceiling. The researchers estimate that a human living to age 125 is a once-in-a-10,000-year event. I can kiss goodbye to seeing the next century, then.