This shit is toxic and it needs to die yesterday

1: A complete taxonomy of internet chum

Toward a grand unified theory of “Around the Web”, i.e. those terrible ad grids you see on desperate websites:

Chum is decomposing fish matter that elicits a purely neurological brain stem response in its target consumer: larger fish, like sharks. It signals that they should let go, deploy their nictitating membranes, and chomp down blindly on a morsel of fragrant, life-giving sustenance. Perhaps in a frenzied manner […] This is a chumbox. It is a variation on the banner ad which takes the form of a grid of advertisements that sits at the bottom of a web page underneath the main content.

2: Visipedia.

Visipedia is a joint project between Pietro Perona’s Vision Group at Caltech and Serge Belongie’s Vision Group at Cornell Tech. Visipedia, short for “Visual Encyclopedia,” is an augmented version of Wikipedia, where pictures are first-class citizens alongside text. Goals of Visipedia include creation of hyperlinked, interactive images embedded in Wikipedia articles, scalable representations of visual knowledge, largescale machine vision datasets, and visual search capabilities. Toward achieving these goals, Visipedia advocates interaction and collaboration between machine vision and human users and experts.

3: NY Times: Trending

Billed as a real-time dashboard of popular Times content. Interesting to see the way they categorise content:

  • Fresh Eyes: stories that are popular with readers who are new to The Times
  • Page-Turner: stories that are holding the attention of our readers
  • Renewed Interest: older stories that are making a comeback and experiencing a second wind
  • Staying Power: stories that have been consistently popular since publication

4: Why “Agile” and especially Scrum are terrible

It’s probably not a secret that I dislike the “Agile” fad that has infested programming. One of the worst varieties of it, Scrum, is a nightmare that I’ve seen actually kill companies. By “kill” I don’t mean “the culture wasn’t as good afterward”; I mean a drop in the stock’s value of more than 85 percent. This shit is toxic and it needs to die yesterday. For those unfamiliar, let’s first define our terms. Then I’ll get into why this stuff is terrible and often detrimental to actual agility. Then I’ll discuss a single, temporary use case under which “Agile” development actually is a good idea, and from there explain why it is so harmful as a permanent arrangement.

5: The history of Henry Mancini’s Moon River

I didn’t realise how much I loved this song until relatively recently. I recorded a version of it, if you’re inclined to listen.

6: Inside the cult of Secret Wedding Pinterest, where fiances are optional

One third of all boards on Pinterest are secret wedding-planning boards.

7: A plant by any other name

On botanical and common names of plants. No, really, it’s a good short thing.

8: Abandoned fishing village in China reclaimed by nature

In the mouth of the Yangtze River off the eastern coast of China, a small island holds a secret haven lost to the forces of time and nature—an abandoned fishing village swallowed by dense layers of ivy slowly creeping over every brick and path.

9: On the fine art of the footnote

Ever since David Hume noted that, while reading Edward Gibbon’s The History of the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire, “One is also plagued with his Notes, according to the present Method of printing the Book” and suggested that they “only to be printed at the Margin or the Bottom of the Page,” footnotes have been the hallmark of academia. For centuries, then, the footnote existed as a blunt instrument, wielded by pedants and populists alike, primarily for the transmission of information, but occasionally to antagonize opponents with arch rhetorical asides. But it would take a couple hundred years until writers again took up the footnote for other, more artful purposes, discovering in this tiny technique emotional and intellectual depth far beyond the realm of the merely experimental.