Audiogram turns audio into video for social media

WNYC, America’s most popular public radio station, is open sourcing its Audiogram service for turning audio clips into videos for native sharing on social media.

The most popular social media platforms—Facebook, Instagram and Twitter—don’t have a content type for audio and are predominantly visual. Facebook in particular sees video at the heart of what it does, and brands are using the format more often. See for example the huge increase in cooking and how-to videos.

It’s increasingly important to share content natively on social media platforms—that is, to use the platforms’ own media types, which are privileged in users’ news feeds.

Common solutions are to use audio hosting services such as SoundCloud or Audioboom, but these are a click away from a user’s Facebook news feed, or st the very least don’t auto play. This means that a user is less likely (source) to click to play or visit the content, which in turn results in low engagement, which in turn leads to lower exposure within Facebook.

I’ve seen this anecdotally when sharing SoundCloud recordings. I see far fewer likes, comments and shares, and people tell me they never saw the posts in their feeds.

WNYC’s tool turns audio files (.mp3 and .wav) into movie files, adding branding, captions and a waveform visualisation. They plan to introduce options for subtitling in a future release. The idea isn’t brand new—organisations like The Economist have had some success already—but by open sourcing their workflow, more people can try it out.

The target audience for the tool is WNYC partners and other news organisations who record interviews, but there are potential uses for:

  • Bedroom musicians to share demos
  • Podcasters
  • Writers of spoken-word fiction or radio plays
  • Stand-up comics

WNYC’s Delaney Simmons:

WNYC shows have been seeing great results. On Twitter, the average engagement for an audiogram is 8x higher than a non-audiogram tweet and on Facebook some of our shows are seeing audiogram reach outperform photos and links by 58% and 83% respectively.

Maybe turning audio into video is the way for it to finally go viral?

Author: Matthew Culnane

Sometime social and UX person working in education. Interested in food, books, music, others. Working out how it all works.